We will be phasing out support for your browser.

Please upgrade to one of these more modern browsers.

Close

Show Times

Saturday 4, December

Patu!

Patu!

PG

Saturday 4, December

President

President

Exempt

Saturday 4, December

Dear Comrades!

Dear Comrades!

M

Saturday 4, December

Sunday 5, December

The Danish Collector

The Danish Collector

E

Sunday 5, December

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

M

Sunday 5, December

Signed, Theo Schoon

Signed, Theo Schoon

E

Sunday 5, December

Crock of Gold: A Few Rounds with Shane MacGowan

Crock of Gold: A Few Rounds with Shane MacGowan

R16

Sunday 5, December

Monday 6, December

The Danish Collector

The Danish Collector

E

Monday 6, December

Tuesday 7, December

The Danish Collector

The Danish Collector

E

Tuesday 7, December

Wednesday 8, December

Pig

Pig

MViolence & offensive language

Wednesday 8, December

Gorillaz: Song Machine Live at Kong

Gorillaz: Song Machine Live at Kong

TBC

Wednesday 8, December

Thursday 9, December

The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

MOffensive language, nudity, drug use & sexual references

Thursday 9, December

Friday 10, December

The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

MOffensive language, nudity, drug use & sexual references

Friday 10, December

Saturday 11, December

The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

MOffensive language, nudity, drug use & sexual references

Saturday 11, December

Sunday 12, December

The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

MOffensive language, nudity, drug use & sexual references

Sunday 12, December

Thursday 16, December

The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel

MViolence, offensive language, sexual references & nudity

Thursday 16, December

Saturday 18, December

Fantastic Mr. Fox

Fantastic Mr. Fox

PGCoarse language.

Saturday 18, December

Sunday 19, December

Moonrise Kingdom

Moonrise Kingdom

MSexual references

Sunday 19, December

Thursday 23, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Thursday 23, December

It's a Wonderful Life

It's a Wonderful Life

PG

Thursday 23, December

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

MLow level offensive language.

Thursday 23, December

Friday 24, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Friday 24, December

Love Actually

Love Actually

MOffensive language & nudity

Friday 24, December

Sunday 26, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Sunday 26, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Sunday 26, December

Monday 27, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Monday 27, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Monday 27, December

Tuesday 28, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Tuesday 28, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Tuesday 28, December

Wednesday 29, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Wednesday 29, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Wednesday 29, December

Thursday 30, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Thursday 30, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

Thursday 30, December

Friday 31, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Friday 31, December

Crock of Gold: A Few Rounds with Shane MacGowan

Crock of Gold: A Few Rounds with Shane MacGowan

R16

The first inkling that this isn’t just a music documentary is the glassy, drunken eyes of the 60-something Shane MacGowan. The contrast with the young MacGowan at the prime of his life, growling out the lyrics to “Fairytale of New York” at the start of this understated documentary, is stark. Director Julien Temple, himself considered punk rock royalty for his music documentaries including Joe Strummer: The Future is Unwritten (NZIFF 2006) and Oil City Confidential (NZIFF 2009), frames MacGowan's story as a quiet triumph, the triumph being that he is somehow still alive after a life of addiction. The portrait-like shots of MacGowan taken for the film echo out a warning about dependency. This cautionary tale is also a one of Irish patriotism, the country’s recent history at the fore. It’s the tale of an incredible literary tradition in Ireland being continued by an unlikely punk rock musician. As the singer recounts his upbringing in rural Tipperary, his meteoric rise to fame in London and his descent into heroin addiction, he also charts Ireland’s journey from The Great Hunger of the 1840s through to the Troubles in the latter half of the 20th century. Shane MacGowan’s folkloric story is swiftly layered with animated sequences of MacGowan’s early life, archival footage of punk gigs, and casual, boozy interviews with the wheezing, hissing MacGowan of today. Six decades of substance abuse have taken their toll on the frontman, but the poet who wrote such aching ballads as “A Rainy Night in Soho” and “The Broad Majestic Shannon” shines through his slurred words and vacant stare. “I’m just following the Irish way of life,” he says. “Cram as much pleasure as you can into life and rail against the pain that you have to suffer as a result.” — Steph Walker, Caitlin Abley

Sunday 5, December

Dear Comrades!

Dear Comrades!

M

Andrei Konchalovsky (Runaway Train, The Postman’s White Nights NZIFF 2015) is one of the last remaining Russian filmmakers of the extraordinary 60s generation that brought us Andrei Tarkovsky (with whom he collaborated on Ivan’s Childhood and Andrei Rublev NZIFF 2019), Sergei Paradzhanov and Kira Muratova. His latest feature returns to this era with its grand scope, superb style – exquisite black and white cinematography in the tall Academy ratio – and historical subject matter. In June 1962, a combination of rising prices and falling wages led the workers of the Novocherkassk Locomotive Works to strike. The strike, an unthinkable disruption in the supposed socialist utopia of the USSR, is violently quashed by the army and KGB, and the massacre is immediately followed by a cover-up that’s just as brutal and unforgiving. We see the story from the perspective of Lyuda (a powerful performance by Yulia Vysotskaya), a member of the City Committee and hardcore true believer insulated by party privilege, whose life of cosy ideological certainty begins to unravel when her daughter Svetka disappears during the massacre. As she searches for her, Lyuda gradually learns more about what really happened in her hometown, and comes to rely on a friendly – perhaps too friendly – KGB officer who wants to help her. Konchalovsky’s richly detailed film, which won the Special Jury Prize at Venice last year, tells a powerful and complex story fuelled by irreconcilable visions of Soviet society that no amount of rhetorical bluster could paper over. — Andrew Langridge

Saturday 4, December

Delicious

Delicious

MAdult themes

Writer/director Éric Besnard’s mouth-watering new historical comedy indelibly pairs Grégory Gadebois and Isabelle Carré as a gifted chef and his unlikely protégé, who must find the resolve to free themselves from servitude. In 1789 France, just prior to the Revolution, gastronomy is strictly the domain of the aristocrats; indeed, the prestige of a noble house is entirely dependent on the quality and reputation of its table. So, when the talented but prideful cook Manceron (Gadebois) serves an unapproved dish of his own creation at a dinner hosted by the self-entitled Duke of Chamfort (C’est La Vie’s Benjamin Lavernhe), the repercussions are brutal, and he is promptly dismissed. The wounded Manceron swears off his passion and retreats with his son to a regional inn visited only infrequently by travellers, and where vegetable soup is the common meal. But when a mysterious woman (Carré) arrives and offers to pay to become his apprentice, the stage is set for a wildly enjoyable tale of reignited passion, mentorship and revenge... and of the creation of France’s very first restaurant. Joining the ranks of films such as Big Night, Chocolat and Babette’s Feast in its joyous depiction of the preparation and love of fine cuisine, DELICIOUS is just that.

Sunday 26, December

Monday 27, December

Tuesday 28, December

Wednesday 29, December

Thursday 30, December

Friday 31, December

Show Future Dates
Fantastic Mr. Fox

Fantastic Mr. Fox

PGCoarse language.

An urbane fox cannot resist returning to his farm raiding ways and then must help his community survive the farmers' retaliation.

Saturday 18, December

Gorillaz: Song Machine Live at Kong

Gorillaz: Song Machine Live at Kong

TBC

Bringing Jamie Hewlett’s visuals to a thrilling live performance, the set features songs from the Song Machine project, along with some revered classics from the group’s back catalogue. Guitarist Noodle, bassist Murdoc Niccals, drummer Russel and frontman 2D are joined by Damon Albarn and the full Gorillaz live band, plus a choice selection of featured artists, showcasing their first live performance since 2018. This special presentation also features a pre-show programme and exclusive behind-the-scenes footage.

Wednesday 8, December

It's a Wonderful Life

It's a Wonderful Life

PG

An angel is sent from Heaven to help a desperately frustrated businessman by showing him what life would have been like if he had never existed.

Thursday 23, December

Love Actually

Love Actually

MOffensive language & nudity

Follows the lives of eight very different couples in dealing with their love lives in various loosely interrelated tales all set during a frantic month before Christmas in London, England.

Friday 24, December

Moonrise Kingdom

Moonrise Kingdom

MSexual references

A pair of young lovers flee their New England town, which causes a local search party to fan out and find them.

Sunday 19, December

Patu!

Patu!

PG

Patu! is the definitive film of the 1981 Springbok tour protests, a technically complex piece of guerrilla filmmaking that explicitly connects apartheid abroad and racism at home. Newly preserved by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision. In 1981, South Africa’s rugby team, the Springboks, were invited to tour New Zealand. The decision was extremely controversial; some people saw it as a tacit endorsement of apartheid while others insisted that politics had nothing to do with New Zealand’s favourite sport. Patu! captured what followed. As thousands of New Zealanders took to the streets to demonstrate their solidarity with the victims of apartheid, battalions of filmmakers and photographers recorded the confrontations with police and rugby diehards. The credit list on this film is a who’s who of the renaissance of New Zealand cinema. Their contributions, which totalled many hours, were edited into an incredibly persuasive feature by Merata Mita. “You may even be in it” ran the tagline on the posters, but the tone of the film is far from self-congratulatory, instead showing the disgust at apartheid and dissatisfaction with New Zealand race relations felt by its subjects. The original 16mm theatrical release version of Patu!, which premiered at the Festival in 1983, ran 113 minutes. Merata subsequently recut the film for international release to 84 minutes. To mark the 40th anniversary of the Springbok tour, Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision have produced a newly preserved version of the 1983 theatrical release of Patu!, for screening in 2021. “Yes, Patu! has a Māori perspective, but it does not override the mass mobilisation of New Zealand's white middle class, neither does it take credit from those who rightly deserve it, everyone who put themselves on the line. My perspective encourages people to look at themselves and examine the ground they stand on.” — Merata Mita 40th anniversary restoration film provided by Ngā Taonga Sound & Vision.

Saturday 4, December

Petite Maman

Petite Maman

PG

8-year-old Nelly has just lost her beloved grandmother and is helping her parents clean out her mother’s childhood home. She explores the house and the surrounding woods where her mom, Marion, used to play and built the treehouse she’s heard so much about. One day her mother abruptly leaves. That’s when Nelly meets a girl her own age in the woods building a treehouse. Her name is Marion.

Thursday 23, December

Friday 24, December

Sunday 26, December

Monday 27, December

Tuesday 28, December

Wednesday 29, December

Thursday 30, December

Show Future Dates
Pig

Pig

MViolence & offensive language

A truffle hunter who lives alone in the Oregonian wilderness must return to his past in Portland in search of his beloved foraging pig after she is kidnapped.

Wednesday 8, December

President

President

Exempt

A power vacuum emerged in Zimbabwe following the ousting of long-term president-cum-dictator Robert Mugabe. With the promise of the first genuinely democratic election in the country in decades, two primary challengers emerged – former vice president Emmerson Mnangagwa and the young, idealistic outsider Nelson Chamisa. In the early stages of Camilla Nielsson’s documentary, a spiritual follow-up to her Zimbabwe-set feature Democrats (NZIFF 2014), Chamisa, an incredibly magnetic presence, drums up enormous grassroots support across the country, captured in vivid campaign rallies of enormous scale. Victory seems secure – until election night, when the forces of the established power begin to stir in the background. Featuring remarkable on-the-ground access to Chamisa’s dogged team and their campaign first for victory, then for justice, President moves to the tune of a classic political thriller, with the highest possible stakes. The film finds disturbing echoes of more highly publicised political crises unfolding around the world, but also profound hope in its portrait of unshakeable determination in the face of decades-long oppression. — Tom Augustine “...it’s the testimony of ordinary folk – the election monitor beaten over the head with an iron bar, for example – that makes Nielsson’s film so chilling. The casual violence, the stony, brazen-faced manipulation of truth in this African nation shows how difficult it is to get a foot on the ladder of democracy, and how tenuous that hold is – there and everywhere.” — Fionnuala Halligan, Screendaily

Saturday 4, December

Signed, Theo Schoon

Signed, Theo Schoon

E

In the context of New Zealand’s culture in the second half of the 20th century, Schoon rocked our world with his outsider's gaze. For all the debate that has surrounded his legacy, in this film portrait, the complex artist is allowed to speak for himself through archive radio, tv and national film unit sources.

Sunday 5, December

The Danish Collector

The Danish Collector

E

For many years no-one was interested in the art of the Impressionists. Artists like Monet, Degas and Renoir were vilified, attacked, and left penniless as a result. Then, something remarkable happened. A new breed of collectors emerged and, before long, they were battling to acquire any work by these new, radical artists that they could find. Amongst them was the visionary Danish businessman Wilhelm Hansen. It was an extraordinary moment in art history; full of drama, intrigue and subterfuge. Some collectors we may recognise and some we may not, but Hansen amassed a remarkable collection housed at his summer home, Ordrupgaard, on the outskirts of Copenhagen. Exhibition on Screen tells his fascinating story and, with exclusive access to a sell-out exhibition at London’s Royal Academy, brings the extraordinary collection to the big-screen in glorious high-definition. From Hansen’s beautiful house and gardens at Ordrupgaard to the streets of bohemian Paris, this film takes you on a journey to discover some of the best examples of 19th-century French art ever collected. 2021 | Documentary | 90 min | Dir. David Bickerstaff

Sunday 5, December

Monday 6, December

Tuesday 7, December

Show Future Dates
The French Dispatch

The French Dispatch

MOffensive language, nudity, drug use & sexual references

A love letter to journalists set in an outpost of an American newspaper in a fictional 20th-century French city that brings to life a collection of stories published in "The French Dispatch" magazine.

Thursday 9, December

Friday 10, December

Saturday 11, December

Sunday 12, December

Show Future Dates
The Grand Budapest Hotel

The Grand Budapest Hotel

MViolence, offensive language, sexual references & nudity

Writer-director Wes Anderson's follow-up to his Oscar-nominated Moonrise Kingdom, starring Ralph Fiennes as Mr. Gustave, the unflappable and perfectly composed concierge of the eponymous 1930s hotel. Shot in Germany, the all-star cast also includes Saoirse Ronan, Jude Law, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Harvey Keitel, Jeff Goldblum and Owen Wilson.

Thursday 16, December

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

The Life Aquatic with Steve Zissou

MLow level offensive language.

With a plan to exact revenge on a mythical shark that killed his partner, Oceanographer Steve Zissou rallies a crew that includes his estranged wife, a journalist, and a man who may or may not be his son.

Thursday 23, December

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

Who We Are: A Chronicle of Racism in America

M

“Who controls the past controls the future: who controls the present controls the past.” — George Orwell, 1984 Based on former ACLU Deputy Legal Director Jeffery Robinson’s illuminating lecture on the history of US anti-Black racism, Emily and Sarah Kunstler’s Who We Are builds upon the framework of his talk with a compelling blend of archival imagery, personal anecdotes (Memphian Robinson was 11 years old when Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated and was one of the first Black students at an integrated school), plus interviews with key figures from recent watershed US race relations moments. Robinson delivers a damning account of slavery and racism in the US, aiming to help break the country’s repeating cycle of ‘two steps forward, three steps back’. The quote from George Orwell’s 1984 above speaks to false narratives that Robinson, and the film, seek to redress: the country was not founded on principles of freedom for all, rather white supremacy is enshrined in the very laws of the land. Who We Are intentionally platformsvoices who’ve known direct loss due to racism (on a personal or community scale), such as Eric Garner’s mother and a 106-year-old survivor of the 1921 Tulsa Massacre. Robinson’s open and well-reasoned approach belies a simmering anger and deep sadness within, which can’t help but seep out, lending a moving urgency to the film and its theses. — Jacob Powell

Sunday 5, December