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Thursday 23, July

True Romance

True Romance

R16Graphic violence

Thursday 23, July

Friday 24, July

Relic

Relic

MViolence, offensive language and horror

Friday 24, July

Saturday 25, July

The Truth

The Truth

PGCoarse language and sexual references

Saturday 25, July

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

Saturday 25, July

Thursday 30, July

My Own Private Idaho

My Own Private Idaho

MSex scenes, offensive language & drug use.

Thursday 30, July

Friday 31, July

Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi

R16Violence, offensive language, drug use & sex scenes

Friday 31, July

Saturday 1, August

Exile

Exile

MViolence, offensive language, nudity, sex scenes & suicide

Saturday 1, August

Ema

Ema

R16Sex scenes, offensive language & nudity

Saturday 1, August

Thursday 6, August

Dark City

Dark City

MViolence

Thursday 6, August

Sunday 9, August

Heat

Heat

R16Violence and offensive language

Sunday 9, August

Thursday 13, August

THX 1138

THX 1138

PGAdult Themes

Thursday 13, August

Thursday 20, August

The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys

MViolence & horror

Thursday 20, August

Friday 21, August

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

MSex scenes

Friday 21, August

Friday 28, August

The Room

The Room

Mcontains Sex scenes, offensive language

Friday 28, August

Corpus Christi

Corpus Christi

R16Violence, offensive language, drug use & sex scenes

"Corpus Christi" is the story of a 20-year-old Daniel who experiences a spiritual transformation in a Youth Detention Center. The crime he commits prevents him from applying to the seminary and after his release on parole he is sent to work at a carpenter's workshop. However Daniel has no intention of giving up his dream and dressed as a priest he decides to - minister a small-town parish.

Friday 31, July

Dark City

Dark City

MViolence

A visual tour de force, Dark City is a neo-noir in the Hitchcockian mold, “a film so original and exciting, it stirred my imagination like Metropolis and 2001: A Space Odyssey” (Roger Ebert).

In proving he didn’t commit a murder, an amnesiac falls deeper and deeper into a rabbit hole of psychosis and treachery.

Stylish film noir and insane pre-Matrix sci-fi from director Alex Proyas. People weren’t ready for DARK CITY in ‘98 but like Blade Runner a cult has risen up and now it is almost essential viewing for awesome things to come out of the '90s.

This visually innovative genre mash-up has a man struggling with memories of his past, including a wife he cannot remember, in a nightmarish world with no sun that's run by beings with telekinetic powers who seek the souls of humans.

Thursday 6, August

Ema

Ema

R16Sex scenes, offensive language & nudity

Few films in recent memory have blazed a trail as passionately as Pablo Larraín’s Ema, which signals the director’s return to the present and his native Chile via the incandescent city of Valparaíso.

Virtual unknown Mariana Di Girolamo, in a star turn you won’t be able to take your eyes off, plays the titular dancer, mother and pyro-lover impervious to social norms. On a quest to reclaim her adopted son Polo, whose absence explains her deteriorating marriage to choreographer Gastón (Gael García Bernal), Ema sets out on a path of deliberate resistance, embracing the orgasmic street movement of reggaeton and embarking on a fluid succession of relationships with people of all genders in her orbit. For reasons that don’t need explaining, she also owns a flamethrower and rejoices in burning shit down – a none-too-subtle metaphor for her relentless pursuit of catharsis and the film’s white-hot energy through which creative and sexual expression bursts forth.

Every bit the firecracker that had critics in Venice, where it premiered, clamouring for superlatives, Larraín’s film is visually stunning, fuelled with combustible symbolism and physicality, and a genuine war cry for dancers, lovers and the matriarchy everywhere. — Tim Wong

Saturday 1, August

Exile

Exile

MViolence, offensive language, nudity, sex scenes & suicide

Are you ready for a virtuosic masterclass in sustained discomfort? From Exile’s opening scene, where chemical engineer Xhafer walks home through his bucolic German suburb only to find a dead rat hanging from his front gate, there’s no escape in this immaculately crafted pressure cooker.

Born in Kosovo, Xhafer (Mišel Matičević, in a compelling, controlled performance) begins to see racism around every corner. But where he finds microaggressions, gaslighting and hatred at every turn, his German wife (Toni Erdmann’s Sandra Hüller) only sees paranoia and honest mistakes. As it becomes clear Xhafer is no innocent himself, the line between real and imagined slights blurs, and his simmering anger slowly rises to a boil.

Director Visar Morina – writing from personal experience as a German immigrant from Kosovo – has gained comparisons to masters of unease like Michael Haneke and Ruben Östlund. But with a canny use of sustained tracking shots and a minimal yet striking score, Morina’s unique voice shines as he builds relentlessly rising tension. It’s an unlikely comparison, but in many ways Exile resembles 2020’s The Invisible Man: it’s what you can’t see that can drive you mad. — Doug Dillaman

Saturday 1, August

Heat

Heat

R16Violence and offensive language

A successful career criminal considers getting out of the business after one last score, while an obsessive cop desperately tries to put him behind bars in this intelligent thriller written and directed by Michael Mann.

Neil McCauley (Robert De Niro) is a thief who specializes in big, risky jobs, such as banks and armored cars. He's very good at what he does; he's bright, methodical, and has honed his skills as a thief at the expense of his personal life, vowing never to get involved in a relationship from which he couldn't walk away in 30 seconds. Vincent Hanna (Al Pacino) is an L.A.P.D. detective determined to catch McCauley, but while McCauley's personal code has forced him to do without a wife and children, Hanna's dedication has made a wreck of the home he's tried to have; he's been divorced twice, he's all but a stranger to his third wife, and he has no idea how to reach out to his troubled step-daughter.

While McCauley has enough money to retire and is planning to move to New Zealand, he loves the thrill of robbery as much as the profit, and is blocking out plans for one more job; meanwhile, he's met a woman, Eady (Amy Brenneman), whom he's not so sure he can walk away from.

Sunday 9, August

My Own Private Idaho

My Own Private Idaho

MSex scenes, offensive language & drug use.

Van Sant’s follow-up to Drugstore Cowboy is another road movie on the skids. This time the footloose bums are a narcoleptic queer hustler, Mike (River Phoenix), and the slumming scion of a wealthy family, Scott (Keanu Reeves), who looks after Mike, and takes him on a quest for his mother… until the time comes to put aside childish things.

A Pacific Northwestern retelling of Shakespeare’s Falstaff-Hal bromance, Idaho was just accessible enough to launch Van Sant into the big leagues, and lushly romantic enough to launch many a young viewer into self-discovery.

Thursday 30, July

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

Once Were Brothers: Robbie Robertson and The Band

In a sense Robbie Robertson only has one story, but it’s a great one: how four Canadian rockers and an Arkansas drummer set out together in the early 1960s and wound up in the eye of that decade’s cultural hurricane. The story of The Band was the basis of Martin Scorsese’s The Last Waltz, and has been revisited by countless rock chroniclers since.

But the years since The Last Waltz have given it a sad coda, with several of Robertson’s bandmates falling to addictions and early deaths, and a bitter disagreement between Robbie and his southern confederate Levon Helm, who accused him of using The Band to further his own ambitions.

It’s hard not to see Once Were Brothers as Robertson’s response to Ain’t in It For My Health (NZIFF11), the unvarnished 2010 documentary that told the tale from Helm’s point of view. Robertson’s version is more magnanimous, yet one can’t help feeling he is, once again, furthering an agenda. And yet the whole thing is brought to life with a wealth of rare and unseen images, plus revealing interviews including the uproarious Ronnie Hawkins and the rarely seen Dominique Robertson, Robbie’s wife. There is also plenty of The Band’s music which, of course, sounds as great as ever. — Nick Bollinger

Saturday 25, July

Relic

Relic

MViolence, offensive language and horror

When Edna, the elderly and widowed matriarch of the family, goes missing, her daughter Kay and granddaughter Sam travel to their remote family home to find her. Soon after her return, they start to discover a sinister presence haunting the house and taking control of Edna.

Friday 24, July

The Lost Boys

The Lost Boys

MViolence & horror

Teenage brothers Michael (Jason Patric) and Sam (Corey Haim) move with their mother (Dianne Wiest) to a small town in northern California.

While the younger Sam meets a pair of kindred spirits in geeky comic-book nerds Edward (Corey Feldman) and Alan (Jamison Newlander), the angst-ridden Michael soon falls for Star (Jami Gertz) - who turns out to be in thrall to David (Kiefer Sutherland), leader of a local gang of vampires.

Sam and his new friends must save Michael and Star from the undead.

Thursday 20, August

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

The Rocky Horror Picture Show

MSex scenes

The Transylvanian mind trip on 35mm!

Rocky Horror “the longest running movie in history” became a sanctuary for people who saw themselves as outsiders, especially queer and gender-nonconforming people. It now unites everyone. No longer mere movie-goers, they became a tribe and kept coming back, week after week.

Jan Grefstad made The Hollywood Rocky Horror’s rightful NZ home, the first to screen it as a midnight movie that ran from 1978 to 1988.

Come back to it's home at The Hollywood - get dressed up and ready to dance, but please leave the rice at home!

Friday 21, August

The Room

The Room

Mcontains Sex scenes, offensive language

Johnny is a successful banker who lives happily in a San Francisco townhouse with his fiancée, Lisa. One day, inexplicably, she gets bored with him and decides to seduce his best friend, Mark. From there, nothing will be the same again...

The Room has been slaying audiences now for over 10 years throughout the world with rabid fans called Roomies screaming out lines and tossing plastic spoons in the air. Why? No matter what you’ve already heard, nothing can prepare you for the once-in-a-lifetime big-screen experience of seeing actor/director/producer Wiseau mumbling his way through this excruciating love triangle about a kind-hearted banker, his best friend and his cheating bride-to-be. It has many unforgettable scenes, but keep your eyes peeled for pictures of spoons, close football tossing, characters vanishing and emerging and even one that announces ‘I definitely have breast cancer’ as a throwaway conversation starter. Unmissable.

Friday 28, August

The Truth

The Truth

PGCoarse language and sexual references

Japan’s modern master of the family drama slides gracefully into the annals of French film history with The Truth, his fourteenth narrative feature and the first made outside of his homeland, boasting no less than the inaugural pairing of icons Catherine Deneuve and Juliette Binoche.

Playing an equally luminous, if far more imperious version of herself, Deneuve is superb as the prickly Fabienne, a legendary actress about to publish her memoirs. Arriving in Paris for the book launch is screenwriter daughter Lumir (Binoche), second-rate TV actor husband Hank (Ethan Hawke) and their little girl Charlotte (Clémentine Grenier, proving yet again Kore-eda’s eye for child actors is impeccable). All appear not as close to Fabienne as her writings suggest.

Meanwhile, Kore-eda’s interests in memory and familial resentment shimmer in the reflective surfaces of the sci-fi movie Fabienne is shooting, about a mother-daughter relationship age-inverted by the time dilation effects of space. It’s a pleasure to witness this dynamic further mirrored in the exchanges between Deneuve and Binoche, among the finest performers of their respective generations, here revelling in the subtle and not-so-subtle friction of their mingling screen personas.

“Nothing in The Truth is more uncomfortably honest than the notion that families are cast much like films are cast; once people settle into their roles, it can become impossible to imagine them being played differently, or by anyone else. The beauty of Kore-eda’s movie… is in the rhetorical way it wonders if it’s possible for people to separate themselves from those performances…

This is a story that recognizes how family is a living thing, and how dangerous it can be to place all your trust in any memory that refuses to make room for a new one. Eventually, Lumir asks Fabienne ‘Do you love yourself, or do you love film?’ Fabienne replies: ‘I love the films I’m in.’ In a movie full of lies, it’s a moment that feels as true as anything Kore-eda has ever made.” — David Ehrlich, Indiewire

Saturday 25, July

THX 1138

THX 1138

PGAdult Themes

Some cinemas have played the Laserdisc of this movie - in order to present the original version.

Not The Hollywood, we are playing an unbelievably rare 35mm print of George Lucas' first (and most adult) picture the visually stunning THX 1138.

It outdoes 1984 and Brave New World in painting a bleak, dehumanized future where every person is given pills to quiet emotions, eliminate sex drive, increase work production and prevent the questioning of authority.

It's in a galaxy far, far away from Star Wars. With Robert Duvall and Donald Pleasance.

This is a super rare chance to see the movie as it was originally shown before George re-imagined it to death.

Thursday 13, August

True Romance

True Romance

R16Graphic violence

A rock ‘n roll adventure following two unlikely lovers who accidentally double cross the mob and hit the road towards Los Angeles. Featuring an all-star cast, slick direction from Tony Scott and an endlessly-quotable script by Quentin Tarantino, True Romance will have you saying “you’re so cool” all month long.

Patricia Arquette and Christian Slater along with the coolest supporting cast ever - Christopher Walken, James Gandolfini, Gary Oldham, Dennis Hopper, Val Kilmer, Brad Pitt and Samuel L. Jackson.

“This is the kind of movie that creates its own universe, and glories in it. Made with such energy, such high spirits, such an enchanting goofiness, that it’s impossible to resist.” – Roger Ebert

“It’s Tarantino’s gutter poetry that detonates True Romance. This movie is dynamite.” – Peter Travers, Rolling Stone

Thursday 23, July